This article presents the portions of HB0105 which address the security of the ballot in Illinois. This is a follow-up from Will Election Day Voter Registration Sneak into Illinois Law? This technical article separates each change by sections so the reader can easily review them. Before each section, I have written a short paragraph to put the change in context.

 

House Bill0105 was approved in the House and Senate of the General Assembly on May 30th, 2014. It is currently on Governor Quinn’s desk. If you want a clean and secure vote in November of 2014 and oppose Governor Quinn changing Illinois election law right before he tries to get re-elected, make sure your voice is heard!  This Bill, if signed, is repealed on January 1st, 2015.

 

Can this be stopped? Illinois voters can help stop Election Day voter registration from being snuck into the election code by calling Governor Quinn’s office in Springfield at 217-782-0244 and in Chicago at 312-814-2121. Tell him that you don’t approve of politicians who change the security of your vote for their own potential political gain.

 

Readers can see who voted for and against HB0105 by going to these two links: Senate Votes and House Votes.

 

 

For this discussion, I excluded a couple of sections in the bill that are not directly related to issues of the security of the vote and have placed these changes in the notes at the end of this article. The changes that are included in the notes are: 9-9.5, 10-6, 10-10, 11-6,[i]

 

HB0105 alters the security of the vote in Illinois just for Quinn’s 2014 re-election bid by amending Sections: 1-12, 4-50, 5-50, 6-100, 10-8, 13-2.5, 14-4.5, 18A-5, 18A-15, 19-2, 19A-10, 19A-15, and 19A-35. The portion that has been changed are underlined and highlighted in yellow. These changes are as follows:

 

 

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Extends In-person Absentee Voting Through Election Day at Universities

10 ILCS 5/1-12) Sec. 1-12. Public University Voting.  Editor CommentsExtends in-person absentee voting at Illinois universities through Election Day and requires election jurisdictions to maintain an open polling place in a high traffic location on public universities in Illinois through Election Day. In the past, in-person absentee voting ended the day before the election, requiring voters to go to their home precinct to vote on Election Day. Consequently, these ballots will be counted at the end of the day on Election Day and do not allow for any cross checking to assure that the students are qualified to cast a vote. Voter registration laws forbid students to be registered in two locations at once.

 

This bill’s attempt to extend in-person absentee voting through Election Day when combined with Election Day voter registration removes opportunities for election officials to authenticate the voter or to make sure that they are not registered and voting in other locations at the same time.

 

 (10 ILCS 5/1-12) Sec. 1-12. Public University Voting.
(a) Each appropriate election authority shall, in addition to the early voting conducted at locations otherwise required by law, conduct early voting in a high traffic location on the campus of a public university within the election authority's jurisdiction. The voting required by this subsection (a) to be conducted on campus must be conducted as otherwise required by Article 19A of this Code. If an election authority has voting equipment that can accommodate a ballot in every form required in the election authority's jurisdiction, then the election authority shall extend early voting under this Section to any registered voter in the election authority's jurisdiction. However, if the election authority does not have voting equipment that can accommodate a ballot in every form required in the election authority's jurisdiction, then the election authority may limit early voting under this Section to registered voters in precincts where the public university is located and precincts bordering the university. Each public university shall make the space available in a high traffic area for, and cooperate and coordinate with the appropriate election authority in, the implementation of this subsection (a).

 

(b) Each appropriate election authority shall, in addition to the voting conducted at locations otherwise required by law, conduct in-person absentee voting on election day in a high-traffic location on the campus of a public university within the election authority's jurisdiction. The procedures for conducting in-person absentee voting at a site established pursuant to this subsection (b) shall, to the extent practicable, be the same procedures required by Article 19 of this Code for in-person absentee ballots. The election authority may limit in-person absentee voting under this subsection (b) to registered voters in precincts where the public university is located and precincts bordering the university. The election authority shall have voting equipment and ballots necessary to accommodate registered voters who may cast an in-person absentee ballot at a site established pursuant to this subsection (b). Each public university shall make the space available in a high-traffic area for, and cooperate and coordinate with the appropriate election authority in, the implementation of this subsection (b).

 

(c) For the purposes of this Section, "public university" means the University of Illinois at its campuses in Urbana-Champaign and Springfield, Southern Illinois University at its campuses in Carbondale and Edwardsville, Eastern Illinois University, Illinois State University, Northern Illinois University, and Western Illinois University at its campuses in Macomb and Moline. (Source: P.A. 98-115, eff. 7-29-13.)

 

Related notes from the Illinois General Assembly's website:

"Amends the Election Code. Provides that each appropriate election authority shall, in addition to the voting conducted at locations otherwise required by law, conduct in-person absentee voting on election day in a high-traffic location on the campus of a public university within the election authority's jurisdiction. Provides that such polling places shall have voting equipment that can accommodate registered voters who may cast an in-person absentee ballots. Provides that each public university shall make the space available in a high-traffic area for, and cooperate and coordinate with the appropriate election authority in, the establishment of such polling places." 

 

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2014 - Register and Vote Grace Period On Election Day
(10 ILCS 5/4-50)  Sec. 4-50. Grace period and (10 ILCS 5/5-50) Sec. 5-50. Grace period. Editor Comments:
 This section extends grace period voter registration and voting through Election Day only for the 2014 eleciton. Traditionally, grace period voting permits USA citizens residing in Illinois to register to vote and to change their residential address and cast a ballot at the same time one day following the close of registration (29 days before Election Day) and up until the 3rd day before the primary or election. The 3 day time frame is important because the election jurisdictions must update voter files to alert the in-precinct Judges of Election of everyone who cast a ballot before Election Day. Election judges use these lists to make sure a voter does not double vote on Election Day.

 

Furthermore, Illinois Law requires all election jurisdictions to keep a list of all early voters (including grace period voters).  This list is to be kept out in the open for voters to inspect and also requires the election jurisdiction to inform the State of Illinois within 24 hours of everyone that cast a ballot. HB0105 wipes out this security measure solely for the 2014 election, when voters can register on the spot on Election Day.

 

Worse yet, these ballots are counted before anyone can determine if the voter is qualified to be registered and to check if they have voted already. At the very least, all ballots cast 3 days or less before Election Day should be cast as a provisional ballot.  HB0105 does permit counting provisional ballots if they are cast during the grace period voting extension, but it does not require it and as written the law  does not provide instruction to election jurisdictions that they are mandated to cast these ballots on provisional ballots. There is no requirement for the PV affidavit to be administered.

 

Most dangerous of all is the extension of voter registration through Election Day. In Illinois, you only need two forms of identification to register to vote, and only one form of ID showing your current address is needed when you register in-person. What constitutes proof of residence? There are few rules. The election authorities prefer a copy of a current utility bill, bank statement, paycheck, government check, or other government document that shows your name and address, but a lease or rent receipt showing your address or any piece of mail delivered to you at your residence, blank check, fishing license, a credit card, or library card works for ID too. You actually can use mail delivered to a PO Box, provided you tell the election official what your real address is.

 

Note: Below, the law is repeated three time because each Article refers to a different type of election jurisdiction: (10 ILCS 5/4-50) is titled “Registration of Electors in Counties Having a Population of Less than 500,000;” (10 ILCS 5/5-50) is titled “Registration of Electors in Counties Having a Population of 500,000 or More;” (10 ILCS 5/6-100) is titled “Registration of Electors in Certain Cities, Villages, and Incorporated Towns.”

 

(10 ILCS 5/4-50)  Sec. 4-50. Grace period.
Notwithstanding any other provision of this Code to the contrary, each election authority shall establish procedures for the registration of voters and for change of address during the period from the close of registration for a primary or election and until the 3rd day before the primary or election, except that during the 2014 general election the period shall extend until the polls close on election day. During this grace period, an unregistered qualified elector may register to vote, and a registered voter may submit a change of address form, in person in the office of the election authority or at a voter registration location specifically designated for this purpose by the election authority. During the 2014 general election, an unregistered qualified elector may register to vote, and a registered voter may submit a change of address form, in person at any permanent polling place for early voting established under Section 19A-10 through election day. The election authority shall register that individual, or change a registered voter's address, in the same manner as otherwise provided by this Article for registration and change of address.

 

If a voter who registers or changes address during this grace period wishes to vote at the first election or primary occurring after the grace period, he or she must do so by grace period voting. The election authority shall offer in-person grace period voting at the authority's office and any permanent polling place where grace period registration is required by this Section; and may offer in-person grace period voting at additional locations specifically designated for the purpose of grace period voting by the election authority. The election authority may allow grace period voting by mail only if the election authority has no ballots prepared at the authority's office. Grace period voting shall be in a manner substantially similar to voting under Article 19.  (Source: P.A. 97-766, eff. 7-6-12; 98-115, eff. 7-29-13.)

 

 (10 ILCS 5/5-50) Sec. 5-50. Grace period.
Notwithstanding any other provision of this Code to the contrary, each election authority shall establish procedures for the registration of voters and for change of address during the period from the close of registration for a primary or election and until the 3rd day before the primary or election, except that during the 2014 general election the period shall extend until the polls close on election day. During this grace period, an unregistered qualified elector may register to vote, and a registered voter may submit a change of address form, in person in the office of the election authority or at a voter registration location specifically designated for this purpose by the election authority. During the 2014 general election, an unregistered qualified elector may register to vote, and a registered voter may submit a change of address form, in person at any permanent polling place for early voting established pursuant to Section 19A-10 through election day. The election authority shall register that individual, or change a registered voter's address, in the same manner as otherwise provided by this Article for registration and change of address.

 

If a voter who registers or changes address during this grace period wishes to vote at the first election or primary occurring after the grace period, he or she must do so by grace period voting. The election authority shall offer in-person grace period voting at his or her office and any permanent polling place where grace period registration is required by this Section; and may offer in-person grace period voting at additional locations specifically designated for the purpose of grace period voting by the election authority. The election authority may allow grace period voting by mail only if the election authority has no ballots prepared at the authority's office. Grace period voting shall be in a manner substantially similar to voting under Article 19. (Source: P.A. 97-766, eff. 7-6-12; 98-115, eff. 7-29-13.)

 

 (10 ILCS 5/6-100)   Sec. 6-100. Grace period.
Notwithstanding any other provision of this Code to the contrary, each election authority shall establish procedures for the registration of voters and for change of address during the period from the close of registration for a primary or election and until the 3rd day before the primary or election, except that during the 2014 general election the period shall extend until the polls close on election day. During this grace period, an unregistered qualified elector may register to vote, and a registered voter may submit a change of address form, in person in the office of the election authority or at a voter registration location specifically designated for this purpose by the election authority. During the 2014 general election, an unregistered qualified elector may register to vote, and a registered voter may submit a change of address form, in person at any permanent polling place for early voting established pursuant to Section                 19A-10 through election day. The election authority shall register that individual, or change a registered voter's address, in the same manner as otherwise provided by this Article for registration and change of address.

If a voter who registers or changes address during this grace period wishes to vote at the first election or primary occurring after the grace period. The election authority shall offer in-person grace period voting at the authority's office and any permanent polling place where grace period registration is required by this Section; and may offer in-person grace period voting at additional locations specifically designated for the purpose of grace period voting by the election authority. The election authority may allow grace period voting by mail only if the election authority has no ballots prepared at the authority's office. Grace period voting shall be in a manner substantially similar to voting under Article 19.

 

Related notes from the Illinois General Assembly's website:

"Extends the grace period for registration through election day for the 2014 general election. Provides that during the 2014 general election, an unregistered qualified elector may register to vote, and a registered voter may submit a change of address form, in person at any permanent polling place for early voting through election day."

 

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Time Off From Work to Serve as an Election Judge

(10 ILCS 5/13-2.5) and (10 ILCS 5/14-4.5) Editor Comments: This section forbids an employer of 25 or more employees from requiring an employee to use earned vacation time to work as a Judge of Election.

 

(10 ILCS 5/13-2.5)  Sec. 13-2.5. Time off from work to serve as election judge.
Any person who is appointed as an election judge under Section 13-1 or 13-2 may, after giving his or her employer at least 20 days' written notice, be absent from his or her place of work for the purpose of serving as an election judge. An employer may not penalize an employee for that absence other than a deduction in salary for the time the employee was absent from his or her place of employment. An employer may not require an employee to use earned vacation time or any form of paid leave time to serve as an election judge.

 

This Section does not apply to an employer with fewer than 25 employees. An employer with more than 25 employees shall not be required to permit more than 10% of the employees to be absent under this Section on the same election day.(Source: P.A. 94-645, eff. 8-22-05.)

 

 (10 ILCS 5/14-4.5) Sec. 14-4.5. Time off from work to serve as election judge.
Any person who is appointed as an election judge under Section 13-1 or 13-2 may, after giving his or her employer at least 20 days' written notice, be absent from his or her place of work for the purpose of serving as an election judge. An employer may not penalize an employee for that absence other than a deduction in salary for the time the employee was absent from his or her place of employment. An employer may not require an employee to use earned vacation time or any form of paid leave time to serve as an election judge.

 

This Section does not apply to an employer with fewer than 25 employees. An employer with more than 25 employees shall not be required to permit more than 10% of the employees to be absent under this Section on the same election day. (Source: P.A. 94-645, eff. 8-22-05.)

 

Related notes from the Illinois General Assembly's website:

"Provides that an employer may not require an employee to use earned vacation time or any form of paid leave time to serve as an election judge"

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Election Day Voter Registration CAN BE Cast as a Provisional Ballot
(10 ILCS 5/18A-5) Sec. 18A-5. Editor Comments:
This section adds an additional reason that someone may cast a provisional ballot. Importantly, it does not require ballots cast via the new 2014 only Election Day voter registration and extension of grace period voting to be cast on a provisional ballot; a simple measure that would at least provide some opportunity for election authorities to verify the registrations of voters and whether they have already voted before the ballot is counted. Once a ballot is counted, it is nearly impossible to recall the votes cast.

 

The second part of these changes (10 ILCS 5/18A-15) Sec. 18A-15) requires that the provisional voter must actually reside in the precinct or within the election jurisdiction when the provisional ballot is cast in order for it to count.  These hastily conceived changes alter procedures of provisional voting in conflict with other portions of 18A.

 

(10 ILCS 5/18A-5) Sec. 18A-5. Provisional voting; general provisions.
(a) A person who claims to be a registered voter is entitled to cast a provisional ballot under the following circumstances:

(1) The person's name does not appear on the official list of eligible voters for the precinct in which the person seeks to vote. The official list is the centralized statewide voter registration list established and maintained in accordance with Section 1A-25;
(2) The person's voting status has been challenged by an election judge, a pollwatcher, or any legal voter and that challenge has been sustained by a majority of the election judges;

 (3) A federal or State court order extends the time for closing the polls beyond the time period established by State law and the person votes during the extended time period;

(4) The voter registered to vote by mail and is required by law to present identification when voting either in person or by absentee ballot, but fails to do so;

(5) The voter's name appears on the list of voters who voted during the early voting period, but the voter claims not to have voted during the early voting period; or

(6) The voter received an absentee ballot but did not return the absentee ballot to the election authority; or

(7) The voter registered to vote during the grace period on the day before election day or on election day during the 2014 general election. (Source: P.A. 97-766, eff. 7-6-12.)

 

(10 ILCS 5/18A-15) Sec. 18A-15. Validating and counting provisional ballots.
(b) If a county clerk or board of election commissioners determines that all of the following apply, then a provisional ballot is valid and shall be counted as a vote:


(1) the provisional voter cast the provisional ballot in the correct precinct based on the address provided by the provisional voter unless the provisional voter cast a ballot pursuant to paragraph (7) of subsection (a) of Section 18A-5, in which case the provisional ballot must have been cast in the correct election jurisdiction based on the address provided. The provisional voter's affidavit shall serve as a change of address request by that voter for registration purposes for the next ensuing election if it bears an address different from that in the records of the election authority. Votes for federal and statewide offices on a provisional ballot cast in the incorrect precinct that meet the other requirements of this subsection shall be valid and counted in accordance with rules adopted by the State Board of Elections. As used in this item, "federal office" is defined as provided in Section 20-1 and "statewide office" means the Governor, Attorney General, Secretary of State, Comptroller, and Treasurer. Votes for General Assembly, countywide, citywide, or township office on a provisional ballot cast in the incorrect precinct but in the correct legislative district, representative district, county, municipality, or township, as the case may be, shall be valid and counted in accordance with rules adopted by the State Board of Elections. As used in this item, "citywide office" means an office elected by the electors of an entire municipality. As used in this item, "township office" means an office elected by the electors of an entire township; Source: P.A. 97-766, eff. 7-6-12; 98-115, eff. 7-29-13.)

 

Related notes from the Illinois General Assembly's website:

"Provides that a person who claims to be a registered voter is entitled  to cast a provisional ballot if the voter registered to vote during the grace period on the day before election day or on election day during the 2014 general election or the voter votes on election day at a polling place established under a specified provision under the Code"

 

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Apply for an Absentee Ballot 90 Days Before the Election
(10 ILCS 5/19-2) Voting By Absentee Electors: Editors Comments:
These changes extend the time for voters to request an absentee ballot from 40 days to 90 days. This means a voter can apply for a mail-in absentee ballot 90 days in advance, but leaves statutory confusion as to when the application should be processed.

 

(10 ILCS 5/19-3)[ii]requires election authorities to “promptly process any application for absentee ballot submitted…” while Sec. 19-4:[iii]  mandates applications may not be processed until 40 days before the election (that is September 25th in 2014), essentially requiring applications to be held in limbo for up to 50 days. So when should applications for absentee voting be processed? ‘Promptly’ when received (up to 90 days before the election), or ‘promptly’ after the 40 days before an election as indicated in 19-4?

 

 

19-4 does have one saving grace for motivated vote defenders. While not part of HB0105, the current law mandatesAll applications for absentee ballots shall be available at the office of the election authority for public inspection upon request from the time of receipt thereof by the election authority until 30 days after the election.”

 

Defend the Vote intends to advocate for various political parties, candidates, and vote defenders to review all applications for mail-in absentee ballots to check the authenticity of signatures on the applications with the voter records. Doing this openly throughout the time applications are processed is an excellent deterrent to voter fraud.

 

If Governor Quinn signs this hastily written bill into law, he will be enacting a clear set of contradictory rules for how absentee ballot applications are processed.

 

(10 ILCS 5/19-2) (from Ch. 46, par. 19-2) Voting By Absentee Electors
Sec. 19-2. Any elector as defined in Section 19-1 may by mail or electronically on the website of the appropriate election authority, not more than 90 nor less than 5 days prior to the date of such election, or by personal delivery not more than 90 nor less than one day prior to the date of such election, make application to the county clerk or to the Board of Election Commissioners for an official ballot for the voter's precinct to be voted at such election. The URL address at which voters may electronically request an absentee ballot shall be fixed no later than 90 calendar days before an election and shall not be changed until after the election. Such a ballot shall be delivered to the elector only upon separate application by the elector for each election. (Source: P.A. 97-81, eff. 7-5-11; 98-115, eff. 7-29-13.)

 

Related notes from the Illinois General Assembly's website:
"Provides that any elector may by mail or electronically on the website of the appropriate election authority, not more than 90 nor less than 5 days prior to the date of such election, or by personal delivery not more than 90 nor less than one day prior to the date of such election, make application to the county clerk or to the Board of Election Commissioners for an official ballot for the voter's precinct to be voted at such election. Provides that the URL address at which voters may electronically request an absentee ballot shall be fixed no later than 90 calendar days before an election and shall not be changed until after the election."

 

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Changes Definitions and Requirements for Early Voting Polling Places
(10 ILCS 5/19A-10) Sec. 19A-10 Permanent polling places for early voting. Editor’s Comments:
This amended article will require election jurisdictions to operate 1 or more permanent polling places for early voting. A permanent polling place could include but is not limited to the election jurisdiction’s office, a court house, a municipal clerk's office, a township clerk's office, a road district clerk's office, a county or local public agency office, a municipal office, etc.

 

 (10 ILCS 5/19A-10) Sec. 19A-10. Permanent polling places for early voting.
(c) During each general primary and general election, each election authority in a county with a population over 250,000 shall establish at least one permanent polling place for early voting by personal appearance at a location within each of the 3 largest municipalities within its jurisdiction. If any of the 3 largest municipalities is over 80,000, the election authority shall establish at least 2 permanent polling places within the municipality. All population figures shall be determined by the federal census.

 

(d) During each general primary and general election, each board of election commissioners established under Article 6 of this Code in any city, village, or incorporated town with a population over 100,000 shall establish at least 2 permanent polling places for early voting by personal appearance. All population figures shall be determined by the federal census.

 

(e) During each general primary and general election, each election authority in a county with a population of over 100,000 but under 250,000 persons shall establish at least one polling place for early voting by personal appearance. The location for early voting may be the election authority's main office or another location designated by the election authority. The election authority may designate additional sites for early voting by personal appearance. All population figures shall be determined by the federal census. (Source: P.A. 94-645, eff. 8-22-05; 95-699, eff. 11-9-07.)

 

 

Related notes from the Illinois General Assembly's website:
"Provides that, during each general primary and general election, each election authority in a county with a population of over 100,000 but under 250,000 persons shall establish at least one polling place for early voting by personal appearance. Establishes requirements for hour of operation of permanent polling places for early voting."

 

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Extends Early Voting Dates and Times
(10 ILCS 5/19A-15) Sec. 19A-15. Extends Early Voting Dates and Times; Editors Comments:
Another exception just for 2014, this act requires early voting to be extended through the second day before Election Day. This shortens the time from 3 days to 2 days before the election for early voting. It creates a critical timing issue for election authorities, who now must print and distribute lists for their precincts and polling places of early voters on Sunday or Monday before the election to assure the information is distributed to the Judges of Election on Tuesday morning. In Cook County alone, that is about 3,500 precincts.

Also for 2014 only, this amended article will extend early voting hours 8 days before an election from 8:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m., or 9:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.

 

(10 ILCS 5/19A-15) Sec. 19A-15. Period for early voting; hours.
(a) The period for early voting by personal appearance begins the 15th day preceding a general primary, consolidated primary, consolidated, or general election and extends through the 3rd day before election day, except that for the 2014 general election the period for early voting by personal appearance shall extend through the 2nd day before election day.

 

(b) Except as otherwise provided by this Section, a permanent polling place for early voting must remain open during the hours of 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., or 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., on weekdays and 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. on Saturdays and holidays, and 12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. on Sundays; except that, in addition to the hours required by this subsection, a permanent early voting polling place designated by an election authority under subsection (c) of Section 19A-10 must remain open for a total of at least 8 hours on any holiday during the early voting period and a total of at least 14 hours on the final weekend during the early voting period. For the 2014 general election, a permanent polling place for early voting must remain open during the hours of 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. or 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on weekdays, except that beginning 8 days before election day, a permanent polling place for early voting must remain open during the hours of 8:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m., or 9:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.. For the 2014 general election, a permanent polling place for early voting shall remain open during the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. on Saturdays and 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on Sundays; except that, in addition to the hours required by this subsection (b), a permanent early voting place designated by an election authority under subsection (c) of Section 19A-10 must remain open for a total of at least 14 hours on the final weekend during the early voting period.

 

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Removes Requirements for Photo ID During Early Voting Only in 2014

10 ILCS 5/19A-35)  Sec. 19A-35. Removes Requirements for Photo ID During Early Voting Only in 2014: Editor Comments: This section, titled Procedure for Voting, is amended for 2014 only. In one sentence and without any public debate, these changes strip the requirement for photo ID to verify the identity of all early voters before they can be given a ballot. Photo ID for early voting is a key security provision that assures people are not showing up to vote fraudulently by assuming the identity of a registered voter.

 

Call Governor Quinn and ask him if this bill is an act of desperation to weaken the security of the vote while he is seeking to keep his office; Springfield at 217-782-0244 and in Chicago at 312-814-2121. Photo ID for early voting has been the law in Illinois since 2006. What is the hurry to change this security procedure without any public debate, and only for one election year?

 

 (10 ILCS 5/19A-35)  Sec. 19A-35. Procedure for voting.

(b) In conducting early voting under this Article, the election judge or official is required to verify the signature of the early voter by comparison with the signature on the official registration card, and the judge or official must verify (i) the identity of the applicant, (ii) that the applicant is a registered voter, (iii) the precinct in which the applicant is registered, and (iv) the proper ballots of the political subdivision in which the applicant resides and is entitled to vote before providing an early ballot to the applicant. Except for during the 2014 general election, the applicant's identity must be verified by the applicant's presentation of an Illinois driver's license, a non-driver identification card issued by the Illinois Secretary of State, a photo identification card issued by a university or college, or another government-issued identification document containing the applicant's photograph. The election judge or official must verify the applicant's registration from the most recent poll list provided by the election authority, and if the applicant is not listed on that poll list, by telephoning the office of the election authority.

 

Related notes from the Illinois General Assembly's website:
"Provides that a provision providing that an applicant's identity must be verified by the applicant's presentation of an Illinois driver's license, a non-driver identification card issued by the Illinois Secretary of State, a photo identification card issued by a university or college, or another government-issued identification document containing the applicant's photograph does not apply to the 2014 general election."

 

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Conclusion: The questions that must be asked are what is the hurry to decrease the security of the vote in Illinois and what is the motive? HB0105 not only decreases the security of everyone’s vote in Illinois, it also opens the door to undetectable voter fraud. If the objective is to permit unregistered voters to vote in Illinois on Election Day, at the very minimum HB0105 should mandate that all ballots cast past the current statutory time limits be cast as provisional ballots. In this way, if a voter is qualified to vote but failed to take the initiative to register on time, they may cast a provisional ballot and have their eligibility authenticated prior to their ballot being counted. This is not a huge inconvenience to the late-to-register voter compared to the loss to responsible voters when their vote is diluted by fraudulently cast ballots.

 

Hopefully, Governor Quinn will decide to defend the right of all Illinois citizens to have their ballot cast, counted, and protected from being diluted by voter fraud by sending this ill-conceived bill back to the General Assembly.

 


Footnotes:
[i]These changes include:

(10 ILCS 5/9-9.5)Disclosures in political communications.
Disclosures in political communications. This subsection does not apply to an expenditure for the preparation, or distribution, or publication of any printed communication directed at constituents of a member of the General Assembly if the expenditure is made by a political committee in accordance with subsection (c) of Section 9-8.10.

 

10 ILCS 5/10-6)  (from Ch. 46, par. 10-6)Sec. 10-6. Time and manner of filing.
where school board petitions are filed shall be filed with the election authority in which the principal office of the school district is located not more than 113 nor less than 106 days before the consolidated election. And requires two copies of ALL objection petitions to nominating papers for ballot placement.

 

10 ILCS 5/10-10)(from Ch. 46, par. 10-10)Sec. 10-10.
…when two or more petitions are filed during the last hour, a lottery will be used to determine who gets the last position on the ballot.

 

And

 

The electoral board shall have the power to administer oaths and to subpoena and examine witnesses and at the request of either party and only upon a vote by a majority of its members, may authorize the chairman to may issue subpoenas requiring the attendance of witnesses and subpoenas

 

(10 ILCS 5/11-6)  (from Ch. 46, par. 11-6) Sec. 11-6.
Within 60 days after the effective date of this amendatory Act of the 98th General Assembly, each election authority shall transmit to the principal office of the State Board of Elections and publish on any website maintained by the election authority maps in electronic portable document format (.PDF) showing the current boundaries of all the precincts within its jurisdiction. Whenever election precincts in an election jurisdiction have been redivided or readjusted, the county board or board of election commissioners shall prepare maps in electronic portable document format (.PDF) showing such election precinct boundaries no later than 90 days before the next scheduled election. The maps shall show the boundaries of all political subdivisions and districts. The county board or board of election commissioners shall immediately forward copies thereof to the chairman of each county central committee in the county, to each township, ward, or precinct committeeman, and each local election official whose political subdivision is wholly or partly in the county and, upon request, shall furnish copies thereof to each candidate for political or public office in the county and shall transmit copies thereof to the principal office of the State Board of Elections and publish copies thereof on any website maintained by the election authority.

 

[ii] (10 ILCS 5/19-3) Any person may produce, reproduce, distribute, or return to an election authority the application for absentee ballot. Upon receipt, the appropriate election authority shall accept and promptly process any application for absentee ballot submitted in a form substantially similar to that required by this Section, including any substantially similar production or reproduction generated by the applicant. 
(Source: P.A. 97-766, eff. 7-6-12; 98-115, eff. 7-29-13.)

[iii] (10 ILCS 5/19-4) Voting By Absentee Electors  Immediately upon the receipt of such application either by mail or electronic means, not more than 40 days nor less than 5 days prior to such election, or by personal delivery not more than 40 days nor less than one day prior to such election, at the office of such election authority, it shall be the duty of such election authority to examine the records to ascertain whether or not such applicant is lawfully entitled to vote as requested, including a verification of the applicant's signature by comparison with the signature on the official registration record card, and if found so to be entitled to vote, to post within one business day thereafter the name, street address, ward and precinct number or township and district number, as the case may be, of such applicant given on a list, the pages of which are to be numbered consecutively to be kept by such election authority for such purpose in a conspicuous, open and public place accessible to the public at the entrance of the office of such election authority, and in such a manner that such list may be viewed without necessity of requesting permission therefor. Within one day after posting the name and other information of an applicant for an absentee ballot, the election authority shall transmit by electronic means pursuant to a process established by the State Board of Elections that name and other posted information to the State Board of Elections, which shall maintain those names and other information in an electronic format on its website, arranged by county and accessible to State and local political committees. Within 2 business days after posting a name and other information on the list within its office, the election authority shall mail, postage prepaid, or deliver in person in such office an official ballot or ballots if more than one are to be voted at said election. 

 

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